MH professionals, thought I’d share my current favorite books and resources.

Meaning

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

[Check out his other books!]


Relationships

The Gaslighting Recovery Workbook: Healing from Emotional Abuse by Amy Marlow-MaCoy, LPC


Narcissistic Abuse Recovery Journal


Christian

Quick Scripture Reference for Counseling extended edition by John G. Kruis


Habits

Atomic Habits by James Clear


Mindful Eating

The Mindful Eating Workbook by Vincci Tsui, RD


Anxiety

Rewire Your Anxious Brain by Catherine M. Pittman, Ph.D. and Elizabeth M. Karle, MLIS


Trauma

Trauma-Informed Yoga: A Toolbox for Therapists by Joanne Spence, MA, E-RYT 500, C-IAYT


Transforming the Living Legacy of Trauma: A Workbook for Survivors and Therapists by Janina Fisher, PhD

Do you have a favorite from this list or a recommendation?

Journal Prompts: Healthy Relationship to Food

Having a better relationship to food is about mindset, which takes unraveling the current messages you have been operating under and re-wiring the brain with messages that serve you.
This all starts out with discovering your current messages and limiting beliefs. After completing these questions, go back through your answers and look for behavioral and emotional patterns. What do you know now that you didn’t know before? How can you improve your relationship to food? How do you take action? Do you need to speak with a professional for support?

Download these questions below. Print them out and share.

  • What does “food” mean to you?  What do you associate food and eating with?
  • What is your relationship to food like? Describe it like you would a relationship with an actual person.
  • How does food make me feel? How do I wish I felt about food?
  • Why do I eat? What 3 words describe my relationship to food right now? What 3 words do I wish did?
  • What do I want food to do for me?
  • Do you consider where food comes from or do you think of food as an end product?
  • Are you a distracted eater or do you just eat? If you are a distracted eater, what usually distracts you?
  • Do you record everything that you eat and drink? If so, what are your intentions behind it? Are your intentions healthy and appropriate?
  • What are the negative thought before, during, and after eating? Eating very little? Eating just enough? Overeating? Binging?
  • When, Where, and What is happening when you feel intense pulls toward food?
  • If I eat when I am physically not hungry, its because….
  • If my emotional eating is trying to tell me a message, what would that message be?
  • What stresses me out the most? What do I do to cope with stress?
  • Describe your first memory of dysregulated eating. How old were you? What were the circumstances of it? How did you feel?
  • What did your parents (or who ever raised you) used to say when talking about your body? What did they used to say when talking about their own body?
  • What did your parents (or who ever raised you) used to say when talking about how you should eat? What did they used to say when talking about how they should eat?
  • Who had the biggest impact on your food habits growing up? Why?
  • Name the positive and negative messages you received around healthy eating.
  • What habit(s) did you establish early on that you would like to transform?
  • Name somebody who you believe has a healthy relationship with food.  What do you notice about them?  How is your relationship with food different, and is it similar in any ways?  What is between you and having a healthy relationship with food?
  • What are you craving in your life, what do you want more than anything, that you are using food to feel? Think of emotions.
  • Who do you see when you look in the mirror?
  • How will changing your dysregulated eating and improving your relationship to food affect your body, mind, and spirit in the future?
  • What parts feel the most challenging when thinking of a better relationship to food? Which parts feeling easy?
  • What patterns do you notice when it comes to nourishing yourself?
  • What inspires you to be healthy? How can you make more room for this in your life?
  • I feel the most like myself when…
  • I would love to do _____________, but I’m not sure I could. Why is that?
  • What do you believe you deserve in life? Thinking about that, what do you need to let go of to make it happen?
  • Imagine your life 3 years from now. If everything worked out the way that you hope for, what would that look like? Love? Family? Work? Wealth? Health?
  • To you, what does it mean to show up as your best self?
  • How could having a healthy relationship with food impact the rest of your life? Relationships? Health? Career?
  • Do you need additional support when working on having a healthy relationship to food? What kind of support do you need?
  • What is my body? How do I connect food and my body?
  • If I could wave a magic wand and have my dream body, what would it be?
  • When I look in the mirror, I feel…
  • What are my biggest daily challenges with food and body? If I didn’t have these problems, how would my life be different?
  • Dear body, I love you because…
  • List three positive intentions that you can use to motivate your journey towards intuitive eating and creating a healthy, sustainable relationship with food and your body. Example: “I will nourish my body every day and will speak kindly to myself to help support a healthy body and mind” Example: “I will speak kindly to my body and appreciate it for all it does for me every day.”
  • What are 3 things that you appreciate about your body?
  • Do you usually eat alone and or randomly? Do you eat with others at set times and places?
  • Write about your relationship to cooking. Do you like to cook or prefer someone else does it for you? Do you see it as a chore or as a fun pastime? Did you grow up in a household where one or both of your parents enjoyed cooking, or did you eat a lot of take-out and TV dinners? What are your favorite dishes to prepare?
  • How do you define the term “comfort food”? What is your favorite comfort food? Is it something your mom or dad or grandma used to make when you were little or an indulgence you only have a few times a year? Describe your ultimate comfort food in detail and reflect on why you associate it with contentment, coziness or well-being.
  • Is there anything about nutrition that you would like to learn more about?
  • Does your family have any special dietary rules?
  • How does your culture influence your eating habits?
  • How does the media / television commercials / social media / celebrities / models / etc. influence your eating habits?
  • What is your opinion on fad diets?
  • If you have tried a fad diet, which one? How did it affect you physically, mentally and emotionally?
  • Do you tend to eat the same foods over and over again? If so, why is that? Would you like to try new foods? How can you begin incorporating new food choices into your day? What would eating new foods do for you?

Download this journal prompt.

McConnels Mill State Park, Slippery Rock Township, PA

Positive Affirmations to Get Through a Crisis or Difficult Time

The types of thoughts that we have can make a big difference in the way that we handle going through a crisis or difficult time. An affirmation is a short and simple statement that is used to bring subconscious thoughts conscious. As thoughts become conscious, we can begin to take control of our way of thinking.

By adopting positive affirmations, we can build a more resilient brain, allowing us to better cope through tough times. Over time and with repetition, our thoughts can change our brains, and even our cells and genes. This process of the brain changing is called neuroplasticity. Affirmations activate the brain’s reward center. – I’ll include a link to an easy to read article that explains the science at the end.

Choose a few affirmations that you feel are most relevant to the crisis or difficult time. You may also create your own. You can download and print out this sheet and place it somewhere in your home or at your workplace. If the affirmations are visible to others, maybe they will benefit? Another idea is to write them on a sticky note or index card. Since sticky notes don’t take up a lot of space, good spots to place them are, on a mirror, refrigerator, or work computer.

Repeat the affirmations a couple times per day to yourself and read them out loud. Reading them out loud is effective because you’re hearing them in your own voice. Neuroplasticity occurs overtime, so give the process time to unfold before you give up on it. The best time to practice the affirmations is when you feel

Let me know if you have any questions.

Affirmations

  • I remain calm in a crisis.
  • I am slowly becoming the kind of person who can survive this storm.
  • I am free of anxiety and am living a calm life.
  • When circumstances change, I will feel all the more grateful for what I have.
  • I am replacing my negative thoughts with positive thoughts.
  • I am attracting positive energy into my body.
  • I am safe and in control.
  • I’m not going to be struggling my whole life.
  • I’m not alone in this world.
  • The situation I’m currently dealing with is only going to make me stronger, wiser and powerful.
  • The feelings of panic are leaving my body.
  • My mind is clearing and I am in control.
  • My body is calm.
  • I find joy in moving forward.
  • I choose to shine, not to suffer.
  • I have what I need to get through this.
  • Problems are opportunities for growth.
  • I am able to see what needs to be handled first move through the rest after that.
  • Living according to my values is what really matters.
  • I acknowledge all the good in my life because I know that this is the foundation for all abundance.
  • I move through life with easy and grace.
  • Life is as good as I make it.
  • I have the power to change the world in a positive way by being myself.
  • Failure is part of the road to success.
  • Good things are going to happen.
  • I am confident that I will get through this.
  • I will always remember how far I have come, not just how far I have to go.
  • I will start where I am, use what I have and do what I can.
  • I know that I can do it.
  • I make wise decisions.
  • Everything will be okay.
  • I’m human and I can learn from my mistakes.
  • I face problems bravely.
  • I am strong.
  • All I can do is my best.
  • Everything that I have gone through has helped me grow.
  • This life is mine to live and I’m going to make the most of it.
  • I’m not going to quit.
  • Things always get better with time.
  • Happiness begins with me.
  • I am resilient and capable.
  • I’m grateful for everything that I have.
  • My mental health is improving.
  • I can deal with it.
  • I feel free and happy.
  • I have abundant energy, vitality and well-being.
  • Five years from now, this won’t matter as much as I think it will.
  • Everything will be okay.
  • I inhale confidence and exhale fears.
  • I’m thriving and make the most of every moment.
  • I’m in a safe space.
  • I’m letting go of my stress.
  • I’m not getting discouraged.
  • I have a positive mindset.
  • Things in my life will start to be better.
  • I am holding my head up high.
  • I breathe in relaxation, I breathe out tension.
  • I can get through anything.
  • I welcome challenges into my life.
  • Challenges are opportunities to learn and grow.
  • I’m stronger than I think.
  • I am getting stronger everyday.
  • I am a strong and capable person.
  • I can handle feeling uncomfortable.
  • I am in control of how I think, feel and behave.
  • Hard times do not get the best of me.
  • I have the ability to overcome every obstacle.
  • I will not let fear take control of me.
  • I release all negativity from my life.
  • When I have done all I know how to do, I choose to let my mind rest.
  • I’ve been knocked down before and I can get back up again.
  • I welcome fear as a sign to be careful, but choose to let go of it when it no longer serves me.
  • I have faith in myself and my future.
  • I have confidence in my skills and knowledge.

Resources

https://thebestbrainpossible.com/affirmations-brain-depression-anxiety/

Download this list of positive affirmations below. There are two pages.

Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, D.C.

Free Positive Thoughts, Take One!

Print out and place this positive thoughts worksheet on your fridge, a bulletin board, work / office common area, etc… where ever you would like to choose a positive thought for the day. Share with your family, friends, and coworkers.

You can tear off the positive thought that you would like to carry with you throughout the day or week. – or stick it somewhere where you can frequently see it. Reflect on the positive thought and apply it, pay attention to how it can change your day and way of thinking.

Instructions

Download below.

Gerard Hiking Trail, Oil Creek State Park, PA

Feelings Wheel

A little bit about how the Feelings Wheel works

I think of the graph as an umbrella. The emotions on the edge of the circle are related to the “main” emotions (or the emotions that we most commonly identify), which are in the very center. For example, when we feel confident and successful, we feel proud, and we feel happy.

If someone is struggling to pinpoint or identify what they are feeling, just seeing all of the emotions in front of them might be helpful.

This graph is good for teaching kids about other emotions, not just the “main” ones. So, when they feel happy about receiving a good grade at school, proud, confident and successful can be introduced to them.

To download this worksheet, see below.

My Positive Attributes

A positive attributes worksheet to help identify, give thought to and celebrate your positive qualities. Download, save and print. Print more than one worksheet, you have more than four positive attributes.