Just Checking In

10 questions to check in on someone’s mental well-being

1. How are you feeling, really? (Mental and physical)
2. What’s taking up your headspace right now?
3. What was your last full meal and have you been drinking enough water?
4. Have you been sleeping?
5. What have you been doing for exercise?
6. What did you do today that made you feel good?
7. What’s something you can do today that would be good for you?
8. What’s something that you’re looking forward to in the next couple of days?
9. What’s something we can do together this week, even if we’re apart?
10. What are you grateful for right now?

Resource:

idontmind.com

25 Pushups for 25 Days Raising Awareness

To help raise awareness for mental health and suicide, I will be doing 25 pushups a day, for the next 25 days. Towards the bottom of this page is a YouTube video that I created of the challenge. The video contains snippets of the 25 days and statistics on mental health and suicide.

I was nominated by a friend to do this challenge because I’m all about fitness and taking on challenges (not to mention, I’m a mental health counselor).

I’m INVITING YOU to do something to help raise awareness for mental health and suicide, as well! Whether you choose to do this push up challenge, another awesome challenge, or share this post, I’d be *so excited* to have you participate!! Please share with me how you’re raising awareness!

Here are the rules for the pushup challenge

*Your 25 days starts tomorrow.
*Everyday, record yourself doing 25 pushups.
*Everyday, you must invite a different person to participate.
— modified pushups (from the knees) count! — just do your best! —

If you are struggling and need someone to talk to, contact me or find a counselor through Psychology Today or Therapy Den (there are many other platforms, too.) If you’re in a situation where you need to talk with someone immediately, please call the number below.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

Believe that you can find hope.

Happy pushup-ing!

25 Pushups for 25 Days Challenge to Raise Awareness for Mental Health and Suicide

This pushup challenge has been:
1) challenging.
2) a joy.
3) a blessing.
• I’ve gotten to share two things that I’m passionate about, fitness and mental health.
• It has been great having chats with people about the importance of supporting one another’s mental health, and most paramount, raising awareness for and preventing suicide.
• There’s a lot to be grateful for.

** Please consider doing the pushup challenge or raise awareness in another way. You WILL make a positive impact on someone’s life! ** Share about what you are doing to raise awareness with me and those around you! ** You can and WILL make a difference. **

Mindfulness Walk Activity

Mindfulness and walking are highly beneficial to your mental health, especially when you do them routinely. Try combining them! Go on a walk. You can walk inside (yes, it still works) or outside, done alone, while walking the dog, or with another person. – just don’t have a conversation with the other person while doing this activity because it takes away the point. No headphones with music or audiobooks. Engage your mindfulness skills and enjoy!

A little about mindfulness

To put mindfulness into action

BE AWARE of what is going on around you physically. Increase your awareness of experience.

PAY ATTENTION by watching, listening and considering the environment. This is what is naturally occurring.

What you see, hear, smell; feeling the ground with your feet as you walk; noticing your breathing; listening to your dog pant; noticing the shadows on the ground; watching the clouds slowly reshape; noticing the texture of the floor; noticing shades of lighting; smell of a candle; ticking of a clock.

REMAIN IN THE PRESENT MOMENT. If you become distracted by thoughts or emotions, accept that you have them, don’t use judgment, and then release them to return to the present moment. You may try to visualize releasing thoughts and emotions. – like the wind blowing them away.

CONSIDER AND BE CURIOUS about the moment and environment in a non-judgmental manner.

Are you “mind full” or “mindful”?

Let me know if you have any questions.

Happy walking!

Cognitive Reframing

How to deal with negative thoughts through cognitive reframing. 

The first set of sentences are examples of “all-or-nothing” and “black-and-white” negative thoughts. The second set is the reframing.

NEGATIVE thoughts

▪︎”I HAVE to have ___, ___, and ___ happen today, otherwise the day is ruined.”
▪︎”If I don’t get this job, everything that I’ve worked so hard for goes right out the window!”
▪︎”My life depends on ___.”

REFRAME

▪︎”I can choose to not allow my day to be ruined. Instead, I can remain hopeful and hold my head high because this isn’t the end, it’s a bump in the road. I can move on knowing that I did the best that I can.”
▪︎”I may or may not get the job that I’ve been working hard towards, but there will be other opportunities and new doors will open. I did learn more from this experience.”
▪︎”What I’m going through is temporary and in time, things change.”

Moraine State Park, PA

Emergency Contacts Lifelines

A list of national emergency resources for suicide prevention, substance abuse disaster distress, domestic violence, child abuse, adult and elderly abuse. [This list is available for download, scroll to the bottom.] * Please note that this list may be subject to change as organizations, companies, and government update their websites and other information. *

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

We can all help prevent suicide. The Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

1-800-273-8255

https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs Suicide Prevention Lifeline

If you are a Veteran in crisis — or you’re concerned about one — free, confidential support is available 24/7. Call the Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, send a text message to 838255, or chat online.

https://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/suicide_prevention/

Military Crisis Line

HOW TO CONNECT WITH A RESPONDER

Call

1-800-273-8255

and Press 1

Text 838255

Chat

Connect online

Support for deaf and hard of hearing

1-800-799-4889

Calling from overseas?

In Europe: Call 00800 1273 8255 or DSN 118
In Korea: Call 0808 555 118 or DSN 118
In Afghanistan: Call 00 1 800 273 8255 or DSN 111

You can also use our Crisis Chat and request a call from a responder.

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/get-help/military-crisis-line

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

National Domestic Violence Hotline

CALL US

Our advocates are available 24/7 at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) in more than 200 languages. All calls are free and confidential.

CHAT WITH US

Our advocates offer the same support through our live chat services. Click here for infoabout the chat or click the “Chat Now” button to start a chat.

STAY SAFE

Your safety is our priority, so all phone calls and chats are completely confidential. Learn more about online privacy and safety.

https://www.thehotline.org/help/

Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline

Our Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline is a 24-hour hotline with resources to aid in every child abuse situation. All calls are confidential. Call 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453) for help.

https://www.childhelp.org/childhelp-hotline/

Family Caregiver Alliance National Center on Caregiving / ADULT PROTECTIVE SERVICES AND ELDER ABUSE HOTLINE

Adult Protective Services assist vulnerable and elder adults to stop and prevent abuse, neglect, or exploitation. Anyone can make a report about suspected abuse to the Hotline.

Phone: 

Adult Abuse Hotline: (800) 222-8000

https://www.caregiver.org/adult-protective-services-and-elder-abuse-hotline-1

Download these resources below (three pages).

Bull Run Regional Park, Fairfax, VA

Positive Affirmations to Get Through a Crisis or Difficult Time

The types of thoughts that we have can make a big difference in the way that we handle going through a crisis or difficult time. An affirmation is a short and simple statement that is used to bring subconscious thoughts conscious. As thoughts become conscious, we can begin to take control of our way of thinking.

By adopting positive affirmations, we can build a more resilient brain, allowing us to better cope through tough times. Over time and with repetition, our thoughts can change our brains, and even our cells and genes. This process of the brain changing is called neuroplasticity. Affirmations activate the brain’s reward center. – I’ll include a link to an easy to read article that explains the science at the end.

Choose a few affirmations that you feel are most relevant to the crisis or difficult time. You may also create your own. You can download and print out this sheet and place it somewhere in your home or at your workplace. If the affirmations are visible to others, maybe they will benefit? Another idea is to write them on a sticky note or index card. Since sticky notes don’t take up a lot of space, good spots to place them are, on a mirror, refrigerator, or work computer.

Repeat the affirmations a couple times per day to yourself and read them out loud. Reading them out loud is effective because you’re hearing them in your own voice. Neuroplasticity occurs overtime, so give the process time to unfold before you give up on it. The best time to practice the affirmations is when you feel

Let me know if you have any questions.

Affirmations

  • I remain calm in a crisis.
  • I am slowly becoming the kind of person who can survive this storm.
  • I am free of anxiety and am living a calm life.
  • When circumstances change, I will feel all the more grateful for what I have.
  • I am replacing my negative thoughts with positive thoughts.
  • I am attracting positive energy into my body.
  • I am safe and in control.
  • I’m not going to be struggling my whole life.
  • I’m not alone in this world.
  • The situation I’m currently dealing with is only going to make me stronger, wiser and powerful.
  • The feelings of panic are leaving my body.
  • My mind is clearing and I am in control.
  • My body is calm.
  • I find joy in moving forward.
  • I choose to shine, not to suffer.
  • I have what I need to get through this.
  • Problems are opportunities for growth.
  • I am able to see what needs to be handled first move through the rest after that.
  • Living according to my values is what really matters.
  • I acknowledge all the good in my life because I know that this is the foundation for all abundance.
  • I move through life with easy and grace.
  • Life is as good as I make it.
  • I have the power to change the world in a positive way by being myself.
  • Failure is part of the road to success.
  • Good things are going to happen.
  • I am confident that I will get through this.
  • I will always remember how far I have come, not just how far I have to go.
  • I will start where I am, use what I have and do what I can.
  • I know that I can do it.
  • I make wise decisions.
  • Everything will be okay.
  • I’m human and I can learn from my mistakes.
  • I face problems bravely.
  • I am strong.
  • All I can do is my best.
  • Everything that I have gone through has helped me grow.
  • This life is mine to live and I’m going to make the most of it.
  • I’m not going to quit.
  • Things always get better with time.
  • Happiness begins with me.
  • I am resilient and capable.
  • I’m grateful for everything that I have.
  • My mental health is improving.
  • I can deal with it.
  • I feel free and happy.
  • I have abundant energy, vitality and well-being.
  • Five years from now, this won’t matter as much as I think it will.
  • Everything will be okay.
  • I inhale confidence and exhale fears.
  • I’m thriving and make the most of every moment.
  • I’m in a safe space.
  • I’m letting go of my stress.
  • I’m not getting discouraged.
  • I have a positive mindset.
  • Things in my life will start to be better.
  • I am holding my head up high.
  • I breathe in relaxation, I breathe out tension.
  • I can get through anything.
  • I welcome challenges into my life.
  • Challenges are opportunities to learn and grow.
  • I’m stronger than I think.
  • I am getting stronger everyday.
  • I am a strong and capable person.
  • I can handle feeling uncomfortable.
  • I am in control of how I think, feel and behave.
  • Hard times do not get the best of me.
  • I have the ability to overcome every obstacle.
  • I will not let fear take control of me.
  • I release all negativity from my life.
  • When I have done all I know how to do, I choose to let my mind rest.
  • I’ve been knocked down before and I can get back up again.
  • I welcome fear as a sign to be careful, but choose to let go of it when it no longer serves me.
  • I have faith in myself and my future.
  • I have confidence in my skills and knowledge.

Resources

https://thebestbrainpossible.com/affirmations-brain-depression-anxiety/

Download this list of positive affirmations below. There are two pages.

Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, D.C.