Mental health therapy: what people think it is vs. what it actually is

Mental health therapy: what people think it is vs. what it actually is.

What people think it is:

• Talking to a therapist about problems.

What it actually is:

• Talking to a therapist about problems.

• Making changes to thoughts and behaviors.

• Psychoeducation.

• Building awareness of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors.

• Between session work.

• Learning and practicing coping strategies.

• Working on becoming less judgmental of certain thoughts and emotions.

• Finding a healthy balance while going through difficult life situations and increasing self-care.

• Increasing empowerment and mental strength.

• Improve overall wellness.

• Focus on personal growth.

• Helping to end the stigma of mental health illnesses.

Myths about Telemental Health

• Telemental health is too new.

Telemental health has actually been around for several years.

• Telemental health is only for the underserved and those who live in rural areas.

Anyone can use telemental health. It saves travel time, gas money, and can more easily fit into a busy schedule.

• You miss out on nonverbal cues with telemental health.

During video chat, nonverbal cues can still be picked up. Proper room lighting, camera placement, and having a strong internet / wifi connection play an important role in this. The mental health professional will let you know if they can’t see you.

• It takes longer to develop rapport with telemental health.

It takes the same amount of time as in-office sessions to develop rapport, keeping in mind that the counselor should be a good fit to work with.

• Telemental health is not secure.

Telemental health can be set up HIPAA compliant and secure to the standard of ethics. There are multiple safeguards in place.

Person-Centered Perspective in Counseling

I use the person-centered perspective when working with clients because it is so important to keep WHO that person is in mind when helping them figure out what they need and how to reach their goals.

A person needs an empowering environment, meaningful relationships, a champion for change, proper facilitation and coordination, and agreed achievements with their counselor.

The person-centered approach is highly effective through the means of telemental health. Counseling is all about the person.

Be well!

The Value of Seeing a Therapist: what does your therapist do when they’re not in session?