Emergency Contacts, Lifelines, and Suicide Prevention Information and Resources

Suicide statistics in the U.S.

• Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. for all ages. (CDC)

• Everyday, approximately 123 Americans die by suicide. (CDC)

• There is one death by suicide in the U.S. every 12 minutes. (CDC)

• Depression affects 20-25% of Americans ages 18+ in a given year. (CDC)

• Suicide takes the lives of over 44,965 Americans every year. (CDC)

• Only half of all Americans experiencing an episode of major depression receive treatment. (NAMI)

• 80%-90% of people who seek treatment for depression are treated successfully using therapy and or medication. (TADS study)

• An estimated quarter million people each year become suicide survivors. (AAS)

Resource:
https://save.org/about-suicide/suicide-facts/

Suicide is a leading cause of death in the U.S.


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) WISQARS Leading Causes of Death Reports, in 2017:

  • Suicide was the tenth leading cause of death overall in the United States, claiming the lives of over 47,000 people.
  • Suicide was the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34, and the fourth leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 35 and 54.
  • There were more than twice as many suicides (47,173) in the United States as there were homicides (19,510).

Resource:
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/suicide.shtml

No suicide attempt should be dismissed or taken lightly.


Why do people attempt suicide?

“A suicide attempt is a clear indication that something is gravely wrong in a person’s life. No matter the race or age of the person; how rich or poor they are, it is true that most people who die by suicide have a mental or emotional disorder. The most common underlying disorder is depression, 30% to 70% of suicide victims suffer from major depression or bipolar (manic-depressive) disorder.”

Resource:
https://www.mhanational.org/conditions/suicide


Do you know what to do if you think that someone is considering suicide?

If You Think Someone Is Considering Suicide:

• Trust your instincts that the person may be in trouble.

• Talk with the person about your concerns. Communication needs to include LISTENING.

* Listen to understand. *

You don’t have to know all of the answers or even some of the answers, just being with a person can be powerful.

• Ask direct questions without being judgmental. Determine if the person has a specific plan to carry out the suicide. The more detailed the plan, the greater the risk.

• Get professional help, even if the person resists.

• Do not leave the person alone.

• Do not swear to secrecy.

• Do not act shocked or judgmental.

• Do not counsel the person yourself.

Resource:
https://www.mhanational.org/conditions/suicide


List of national emergency resources for suicide prevention, substance abuse disaster distress, domestic violence, child abuse, adult and elderly abuse

Finish Stronger Counseling – Emergency Contacts and Lifelines

* Please note that this list may be subject to change as organizations, companies, and government update their websites and other information. *


Check out these charities and articles to find out how you can help

Charity Navigator


American Foundation for Suicide Prevention


Very Well Mind – Leading Mental Health Charities and Organizations


The Recovery Village – Mental Health First Aid for Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors


follow my blog to receive mental health tips

Connoquenessing Valley Heritage Trail, PA

Person-Centered Perspective in Counseling

I use the person-centered perspective when working with clients because it is so important to keep WHO that person is in mind when helping them figure out what they need and how to reach their goals.

A person needs an empowering environment, meaningful relationships, a champion for change, proper facilitation and coordination, and agreed achievements with their counselor.

The person-centered approach is highly effective through the means of telemental health. Counseling is all about the person.

Be well!

follow my blog to receive mental health tips

The Value of Seeing a Therapist: what does your therapist do when they’re not in session?

follow my blog to receive mental health tips

About My YouTube Channel

The purpose of my YouTube channel is to provide you with information on mental health and tips to help you get through everyday life. Since I’m passionate about running and the outdoors, you may also see that as it relates to mental health.

Liggett Trail, Cook Forest State Park, PA

follow my blog to receive mental health tips

Emotional Support Animals VS Therapy Animals VS Service Dogs

Have you ever wondered the difference between an Emotional Support Animal, Therapy Dog or Service Dog? This article is a brief overview, of the different companions.


Emotional Support Animal (ESA)

  • The animal provides therapeutic benefits to the owner at home through companionship.
  • Steps to getting an ESA:
  • Determine if an ESA is right for you. Ask yourself what are the possible benefits. Understand the work that is involved with owning an animal.
  • Find a licensed professional mental health therapist who is knowledgeable about ESAs. They will walk you through mental health assessments and other parts of the process. The therapist can write a legitimate letter for you to use and identify your animal as an ESA.
  • Adopt an animal. Do your research and choose an animal carefully. An animal can come from a rescue, shelter or trusted breeder. Common ESAs: dogs; cats; reptiles; rodents; birds (even chickens!). If you already have a pet that you would like to be your ESA, that’s great! Just be sure that your pet suits your needs.
  • Train your ESA to behave properly. Only basic animal training is needed, there are no special requirements. You are responsible for your animal’s behavior and if the animal damages property, being responsible paying for the damage.
  • Use your ESA letter properly.
  • Enjoy your emotional support companion!

Therapy Animal

  • The most common type of therapy animal is a dog, but other animals, like cats and horses can also be supportive.

Therapy Dog

  • Used in facilities, such as hospitals and retirement homes to provide affection and comfort.
  • Not all dog breeds fit being a therapy dog. The dog must be calm, affectionate and friendly to strangers at all times.
  • Therapy dogs don’t have to be trained for specific tasks like service dogs.
  • The dog needs to complete obedience training and register to become a certified therapy dog.

Service Dog

  • Trained to help people with visual impairment, diabetes, mental illnesses, and other disabilities.
  • The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and local government gives the option to people with disabilities to have a service dog, and (the ADA) punctuates that the dog is a working animal.
  • Must be well-trained to complete specific tasks related to the needs of the person with the disability. The dog must be fit to complete jobs that you cannot complete yourself.
  • Document all of the dog’s training and certificate.
  • Follow the service dog laws.

Resources

https://www.caninejournal.com/service-dog-vs-therapy-dog-vs-emotional-support-dogs/

https://esadoctors.com/how-to-get-emotional-support-animal/


A short Equine Therapy article

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/ending-addiction-good/201708/the-therapeutic-value-horses

Download the information from this article below, the resources are included.

Beaver County, PA

follow my blog to receive mental health tips

About My Facebook Page

“Like” and “follow” my mental health page on Facebook if you are interested in psychology and all things that are therapeutic and healthy lifestyle. I post mental health articles, blogs, and free downloadable worksheets (blogs (subscribe at the bottom of my page) downloadable worksheets are also available on my website).

My favorite things to share are inspirational and motivational quotes, random mental health facts and trail running photos that I took myself. You will occasionally see something about my favorite sport, running… and specifically, ultramarathon running. An ultramarathon is a distance further than a marathon. Running is about mental strength just as much as it is about physical strength. Running can teach us lessons that carry into everyday life, I like to integrate these things into my work in the mental health field.

I look forward to connecting with you.

follow my blog to receive mental health tips

Be well and happy running!

~ Shannon

California

What I do as a therapist

People avoid going to therapy and there are a ton of valid reasons why. I believe that among the top reasons that people avoid seeing a therapist are due to anxiety, having a fear of the unknown, and the stigma around mental health and needing support. I want to see people receive the help that they need. I value the freedom and opportunities we have to reach out for help, it is okay to not be okay and to need to speak with somebody. It is okay to want some support. Feeling anxious or fearful are normal responses when you know that you will be divulging sensitive information to a stranger. This really is a big deal. To remove a little anxiety and stigma, here are some things that you can expect when you meet with me, and I know that all therapists strive to uphold these qualities and standards.

As a therapist, i won’t

  • Try to fix you.
  • Give you advice.
  • Tell you what to do.
  • Pretend to be the expert on your life.
  • Assume what is best for you.
  • Have all the answers.
  • Make the difficult stuff disappear.

As a therapist, I will

  • Have a non-judgmental approach.
  • Provide a fresh perspective.
  • Remind you that you aren’t broken.
  • Give you room to access your own wisdom.
  • Support you in figuring out what to do.
  • Remember that only you know what is best for you.
  • Honor that I don’t know it all.
  • Collaborate with you on how to make the difficult stuff easier to sit with.
Oil Creek State Park Railroad Bridge, PA

follow my blog to receive mental health tips

Western Pennsylvania Nonprofit Organizations and Charities (Directories)

Resources, resources, resources!
“Knowledge is like a garden; if it is not cultivated, it cannot be harvested.” African Proverb

I want to help provide people with the tools to cultivate their own gardens. Below are links to directories for nonprofit organizations and charities.

The Pittsburgh region is blessed by over 3,000 nonprofit organizations. Services and opportunities are right around the bend.



Great Nonprofits (rated):
https://greatnonprofits.org/city/pittsburgh/PA

Charity Navigator (rated):
https://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.metro&metroid=19&linkback=1

Together We Flourish (by county):
https://togetherweflourish.com/nonprofits-by-interests/

Nonprofit Talent: find a job, internship or volunteer opportunity:
https://jobs.nonprofittalent.com/

Pittsburgh Gives: search for nonprofits:
https://www.pittsburghgives.org/nonprofits

Connoquenessing Creek, Harmony, PA

follow my blog to receive mental health tips