You Will Keep Going


If you need support, reach out to a counselor, don’t hesitate. Most counselors are providing teletherapy now. You don’t have to leave your home and it is easy to get started.

I specialize in telemental health. Contact me if you are a resident of Pennsylvania and would like to talk.

Keep going!

Learn about teletherapy here.

Whetstone Ridge Trail, VA

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Plant-Based Mental Health Counselor (and Plant-Based Doctors Directory)

Are you looking for a plant-based doctor or professional guidance on going plant-based?

Visit Plant-Based Doctors to find the right healthcare professional for you!

Plant-based counselor

Did you know that I’m a plant-based counselor?

I’ve been vegan for years, and I greatly care about being proactive towards my health and the environment.

I strive to encourage people to have a well-balanced lifestyle and to not only work on their mental health, but their physical health, as well.

If you think we’d be a good fit to work together, reach out and I’d be happy to answer your questions. – I’m not a certified dietitian, though I will probably recommend you find one if you need one. — I have experience working with people who battle eating disorders.

Finding Affordable Mental Health Counseling

You can find the right outpatient private practice counselor for you at an affordable rate, you just need to know how to go about doing so.

Almost everyone shops around looking for the right counselor who either accepts their insurance or that they can afford to see if they pay out-of-pocket. A breakdown in the process of seeking help occurs when someone finds out that the counselor doesn’t accept their insurance or their rate isn’t within their out-of-pocket budget, the person tends to cutoff the conversation right there. They hang up the phone or don’t reply to the email. Unfortunately, people will fully end their search because they aren’t sure what else there is to do.

Remain hopeful

There are alternative and proactive ways to maintaining the conversation when you find out that the counselor doesn’t accept insurance or the rate isn’t within budget. Ask questions.

Ask the counselor these questions

* Even if you want to use your insurance, keep your options open by considering out-of-pocket because part of your goal is to find a counselor who is the right fit to work with. Therapy can be a great experience with the right professional… laughter is allowed in therapy. When someone closes off the out-of-pocket option, they’re also possibly preventing finding the person who they feel comfortable talking to. *

• Do you offer a lower rate?

• Do you offer a sliding scale?

• Do you offer pro-bono?

• Can you recommend anyone who may be able to help?

• Do you offer other services that might be able to help me?

Counselors are open and willing to talk about fees and other services. They aim to be non-judgmental and want to meet people where they are at. It doesn’t hurt to find out if they are able to meet you where you’re at financially.

Keep on the lookout for free resources and tips that the counselor may offer. This could be an educational social media page, YouTube channel, blog that you could subscribe to, or ebook. Don’t pass up free resources, take advantage.

Tip: stay organized

Keep track of who you talked to, how to contact them, the questions you have, and their answers all in a notebook. Doing this will manage stress and remembering who said or offered what. Be mindful of where you keep your notebook to protect your confidentiality.

Article on How to Find the Right Counselor

Did somebody say free?

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Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes, Death Valley National Park, CA

Resilient Motherhood

Resilient Motherhood is a team of experts serving Pittsburgh, PA & Westmorland, PA.

They are dedicated to helping women feel strong and confident in their bodies during pregnancy, motherhood, and beyond.

Resilient Motherhood was born out of passion and necessity.

Read their story.

Explore their services.

Resilient Motherhood

Survivors: Resilient Motherhood helps survivors of sexual assault and abuse re-claim their power and birth with confidence.

Labor and Delivery Prep

“Prevent perineal tearing, fearlessly manage pain and triggers, empower yourself to have
a healing birth.”

Fix Pain

“The truth is that many survivors have pelvic pain. Like your trauma, let’s make it a thing of the past. We are in this together.”

Stabilize Your Mood

“We will work together to use heart rate variability, food, and exercise to help you
feel your best every day.”

Learn more

Don’t forget to visit their resources. They have resources available for download and a blog. Follow them on Instagram and Facebook.

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Just Listen: don’t worry about giving someone the perfect piece of advice

Just being a listener is powerful. Depending on the person who needs listened to and the situation, listening can be the only thing needed to help somebody. We’re bombarded with messages about listening and responding in a particular way. That we must follow A, B, and C or we aren’t being effective or that we might cause harm to the speaker. While we should aim to listen skillfully and to do no harm, we still can’t forget [or minimize] that just listening is impactful. We don’t always need to know what to say, that should relieve some pressure, all you have to do is listen and be present.

Simply listen

If you have a friend or family member who is experiencing issues and concerns, consider just listening to them first, rather than listening and offering up advice. While listening, practice being an active (non-distracted) listener, paying attention to nonverbal messages, listening to understand, making some eye contact, and being empathetic.

Keep in mind, that the speaker might not need an in-depth conversation. They may just need someone to listen and be there for them. The act of sharing out loud helps lift weight off of shoulders and problem solve. The brain processes differently while speaking out loud, as opposed to keeping your thoughts to yourself.

Ivy, mentor and mental health advocate, wrote about the power of listening. She says, “I have always emphasized that it is important even if you don’t agree with or understand how someone is feeling, to simply just listen to them and what they are going through. Simply asking someone if they are okay and letting them know you are there for them, is something so simple, yet so extremely powerful. Too often we feel like we won’t have the right words to say to people who reach out to us in need, so we keep our distance as a safer alternative. But you can make such a huge difference by just listening to someone’s story.”

Ivy continues, “When we listen to others, we let them know without even saying the words that their feelings are valid, that they themselves are valid and that we care about them. When we listen to other people’s story and allow them to be vulnerable and honest with us, the unexpected benefit is that we too can feel empowered to tell our own story and feel confident that someone will also listen to us when we are struggling.”

Read more of this excellent article here.

Listen to someone’s story and let them know that you’re there for them.

When you want to help, but feel like you can’t

Have you ever felt overwhelmed or stressed out by feeling like you need to help that someone who is coming to you about their problems? Maybe you have your own things that you’re going through and don’t have enough space to hold what they’re going through, as well. Perhaps, you’re feeling burnt out and need to practice self-care. You shouldn’t try to help another person when your glass is empty. Nothing comes out of an empty cup when you try to pour from it. [Even if your glass is full, practice daily self-care.] Whatever your situation, if you still want to be there for them, then just being a listener takes some pressure off of you. You can be present for the other person, but not hold as much responsibility in giving advice.

When to suggest that someone considers talking to a professional counselor

Know when to suggest that someone needs to go seek a mental health professional’s services. Topics like abuse, neglect, addiction, suicidal ideation, and suicide are red flags. Report abuse and neglect when you suspect something serious is going on, so that it can be looked into. Know the signs of suicide in order to prevent it and know what to do. Non-Judgmentally, ask open-ended questions to see what’s going on. Gently suggest that they speak with a mental health professional. Mention two or three benefits of speaking with a professional.

For information on lifeline contacts and resources, visit here.

And more, go here.

Benefits of professional mental health counseling. Bust the myths and check out what counselors actually do.

What therapy actually is:

https://finishstrongercounseling.com/2020/12/22/mental-health-therapy-what-people-think-it-is-vs-what-it-actually-is/

The value of seeing a therapist:

https://finishstrongercounseling.com/2020/07/27/the-value-of-seeing-a-therapist-what-does-your-therapist-do-when-theyre-not-in-session/

Stuck on finding a counselor?

How to find the right counselor.

Consider talking with a counselor…

Other times when a person should talk with a professional is when what they’re going through has impacted their life in such a way that they have difficulty functioning and maintaining a normal routine. Their job, family, social life, sleep, eating, major areas like that have been impacted. Especially, if this has been going on for a few weeks or longer, but really anyone, at anytime should go talk with a professional. It’s easier to fix something before it gets out of hand. This distress scale can help keep tabs on the impact that what you’re going through has on you.

Final words on just listening

Mindy Pierce, MA, LPC of Grow Counseling adds this to help us think further as listeners.

“Here are a few questions to help us think further about the powerful importance of listening and how well we listen:

• Who is the best listener you know?

• What makes that person a good listener?

• How do you feel when you are with that person?

• What can you learn from that person that would make you a better listener?

• What do you hesitate to talk to your partner about? Why?

• What happens to those withheld thoughts and feelings?

• What are the consequences of that withholding for you? For the relationship?

• What conversations would you like to go differently?

• If people think you aren’t listening to them, what will they assume it means? What will this lead to?

The next time something is really bothering you, notice if something holds you back from sharing that with someone. What fears or expectations do you have about what would happen if you shared? And if you do share, what happens?”

The rest of Mindy’s thoughtful article can be found here.

Being present and listening can be helpful to someone. Your friend or family member might just need someone to talk to, so they can empty part of what they’re carrying, a way to problem solve, or process what they’re going through. As a listener, a response isn’t always required. Be there for someone by listening to their story and letting them know that you care. Don’t underestimate the power of just listening, it’s helpful.

Harmony Trail, Harmony, PA

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Are You Ready for Change? I’m ready to help.

Coffee, set, go!

I’m ready to help you tackle change.

I help people:

  • Learn how to manage worry and anxiety.
  • Learn how to better regulate emotions.
  • Through life transitions.
  • Learn how to take better care of their mental health.
  • Make positive, lasting change.
  • Get in touch with what’s actually going on underneath the problem.

I’m working with people all over the state of Pennsylvania. If you’d like to learn more about my telemental health services, browse my website or send me an email.

Maybe we’re a good fit to work together?

Be well!

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Myths about Telemental Health

• Telemental health is too new.

Telemental health has actually been around for several years.

• Telemental health is only for the underserved and those who live in rural areas.

Anyone can use telemental health. It saves travel time, gas money, and can more easily fit into a busy schedule.

• You miss out on nonverbal cues with telemental health.

During video chat, nonverbal cues can still be picked up. Proper room lighting, camera placement, and having a strong internet / wifi connection play an important role in this. The mental health professional will let you know if they can’t see you.

• It takes longer to develop rapport with telemental health.

It takes the same amount of time as in-office sessions to develop rapport, keeping in mind that the counselor should be a good fit to work with.

• Telemental health is not secure.

Telemental health can be set up HIPAA compliant and secure to the standard of ethics. There are multiple safeguards in place.

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Person-Centered Perspective in Counseling

I use the person-centered perspective when working with clients because it is so important to keep WHO that person is in mind when helping them figure out what they need and how to reach their goals.

A person needs an empowering environment, meaningful relationships, a champion for change, proper facilitation and coordination, and agreed achievements with their counselor.

The person-centered approach is highly effective through the means of telemental health. Counseling is all about the person.

Be well!

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The Value of Seeing a Therapist: what does your therapist do when they’re not in session?

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How to Find the Right Counselor

It can be challenging and anxiety provoking to find the right counselor. Sometimes it’s difficult knowing how to find the help that you specifically need. This article’s tips will answer some questions, help develop a plan, relieve stress, and lead you to finding the right counselor.

Licensed Professional Counselors

A licensed professional counselor works with people in most areas of life: Reducing anxiety; coping; adjusting to changes; dealing with depression and grief; overcoming trauma; fighting addiction; educating people about mental illnesses; family, marriage, and couples issues; relationships and communication; mental health disorders.

When choosing a counselor, look for someone who seems like they would be a good “fit”

Specialties

Look at the counselor’s specialties, they should be mentioned or listed on the counselor’s profile and website.

Examples:

• If you need help taking steps fighting an addiction, look for someone who specializes in addiction counseling.

• If you are going through a divorce, find someone who specializes in marriage and divorce.

• If you’re looking for Christian faith-based counseling, try searching in an online Christian counselor directory if you aren’t sure where the local Christian counselors are.

Approach to Therapy / Theoretical Orientation

Check out the counselor’s approach to therapy and the theories they apply.

Examples:

• Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
• Person-Centered
• Gestalt

Some counselors use a variety and combination of these. Don’t stress on knowing the methods and theories, the counselor can teach you if you’d like to learn. Having a basic understanding that these theories are out there can lend a hand in making a decision about who you see. Certain theories are more appropriate than others when treating certain mental illnesses, the counselor will know these details.

When Using Health Insurance

If you want to use insurance to cover the cost, contact them and inquire about behavioral mental health providers in your area. Find out what your co-pay is. If you’re seeking a teletherapist, check to make sure your insurance covers teletherapy (again, check to see if there’s a co-pay because virtual mental health services might cost different than in-office services.). Once you contact a counselor, double check that they accept your insurance.

Find a Counselor Through an Online Directory

Another way to find a counselor is to check online directories. Some of these directories allow you to filter, which saves time and helps you find a counselor who better suits your needs. Psychology Today is a fantastic place to search for a counselor. TherapyDen is also an awesome site to look at. If you’re looking for a counselor who is plant-based or vegan, try Plant-Based Doctors. Using an online directory is a great way to find exactly what you’re looking for.

Create a List of Counselors and Questions

When you find a counselor that you’re interested in working with, write down their contact information and website. Create a list of five or so counselors and then visit their websites to learn more about them. As you learn more, you may realize that they don’t quite fit your needs, so you can cross them off your list. Jot down any questions that you may have for that counselor about their services.

Learn About the Counselor Through Social Media

You can learn a lot about a counselor’s approach, views, theoretical orientation, personality, vibe, etc, through their business’ social media page and blogs. Check out what they post and write about. Look for pictures of their office, sometimes there are pictures to make clients feel more comfortable in knowing what to expect.

Contacting the Counselor

Whether you’re contacting them through email or a phone call, make sure that you’re in a private space so that your confidentiality won’t be at risk when you share with them a little about what you are seeking help for. Sharing a few sensitive details helps the counselor determine whether they can help you or if they need to lead you to other services.

After learning more about the counselors, call them to have your questions answered or to schedule an appointment. I can’t speak for every counselor, but most offer a free phone consultation. Ask about whether they accept insurance and the cost of session. Ask about what you can expect during a session. Ask about the paperwork process. Ask any other questions that come to mind and that you wrote on your list.

If you’re having difficulty reaching a counselor by calling, consider emailing them. Counselors should have their emails set up safe and secure. Texting a counselor’s phone isn’t secure, so don’t use that method of contact.

Notice Thoughts, Feelings, & Gut Instinct

When you’re talking with the counselor on the phone, briefly check-in with your thoughts, feelings, and gut instinct. Are you comfortable? Do you see yourself sitting across from them? Is your gut feeling telling you that this is the right person? The gut instinct is usually accurate.

Ask Friends and Family

To get a better idea about what to look for in a counselor, ask your friends and family who are seeing one what they like about them. This isn’t a good way to get a referral, but it can give you an idea on counselor personality, traits, and practices to look for.

It can be tough finding the right counselor, but using these tips to create a simple plan will make it easier.

Chain O’Lakes State Park, Noble County, Indiana

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